DNA scientists claim that Cherokees are from the Middle East

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The Cherokees have lived in the Southeastern United States for over 10,000 years.Cherokees developedand cultivated corn, beans and squash – “the three sisters” – along with sunflowers and other crops.

Archaeological evidence, early written accounts, and the oral history ofthe Cherokees themselves show the Cherokees as a mighty nation controlling more than 140,000 square miles with a population of thirty-six thousand or more. Often the townhouse stood on an earthen mound, which grew with successive ceremonial re-buildings.”

Before European Christians Forced Gender Roles, Native Americans Acknowledged 5 Genders

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It wasn’t until Europeans took over North America that natives adopted the ideas of gender roles. For Native Americans, there was no set of rules that men and women had to abide by in order to be considered a “normal” member of their tribe.

In fact, people who had both female and male characteristics were viewed as gifted by nature, and therefore, able to see both sides of everything. According to Indian Country Today, all native communities acknowledged the following gender roles: “Female, male, Two Spirit female, Two Spirit male and Transgendered.”

Native American man turns down offer of $1.8 million for his home – in order to preserve Sacred Land

Deep in the heart of the city of Miami, about two blocks from Brickell Street, sits a small wooden house with a garden and a natural spring.

 The property is owned by Ishmael Bermudez, a 65-year old man with Native American heritage. Bermudez, who also goes by the name Golden Eagle, has watched Miami grow as tall buildings, major thoroughfares, and other new constructions have dwarfed his tiny home.

Bermudez has spent the last 50 years discovering Native American artifacts, fossils, and prehistoric objects in his garden, which has been labeled “the Well of Ancient Mysteries.”

Texas School Won’t Let Native American Attend His First Day Of Kindergarten Because Of His Long Hair

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Malachi Wilson’s parents are Navajo and Kiowa, and they believe that their 5 year-old son’s hair is sacred and should not be cut. So Wilson arrived for his first day of kindergarten last week with his long hair in a braid. The principal at F. J. Elementary School in Seminole, Texas promptly send Wilson home, saying that he was not allowed to attend school with long hair because he is a boy.